Helping Your Student Athlete Prepare For a New Season

Student Athletes

“Do you know what my favorite part of the game is? The opportunity to play.”

Mike singletary

I was recently asked to write a short article for a magazine to help parents to understand some of the areas they can focus on to help their student athletes who are preparing to go back to school and will have some tryouts coming up in their sports.

For many kids, sports are a huge part of their life. They love to play, and they have big dreams about their future as an athlete.

The hard work and dedication to the physical aspect of their sport is an important part for them to become the best that they can be. But the mental side of the game is just as important and often the differentiating factor between successful athletes.

This is where I come in and have the opportunity to work with athletes to build their confidence, create a powerful mindset, and unlock their full potential.

After this past year and the mental roller coaster these student athletes went though, this is more important than ever.

If you have a son or daughter who will be trying out for a sport, consider what they’ve been through and how you might be able to help them prepare for the upcoming season.

Which Athletes Should be Working on Their Mental Game?

“Champions aren’t made in the gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside of them – a desire, a dream, a vision.”

Muhammad Ali

That’s easy… All Of Them!

In my program, The Confident Athlete (www.JeffHeggie.com/ConfidentAthlete) I work with athletes ranging from middle school to professionals.

Developing self-confidence and a growth mindset is an advantage for athletes of all ages and at all levels. Plus, these are skills that they take far beyond their sport.

How Do I Help My Son/Daughter Get Their Drive Back?

Tia Heggie Centennial Tournament Calgary Alberta - Cardston High School Girls Basketball

“When you feel like stopping, thing about why you started.”

Some of these young athletes have dedicated years to the sport they love and have had big goals and dreams. But after this past year they feel defeated and have lost their drive.

The most important things I help these athletes figure out and you should talk to your son/daughter about are:

– Why do you play?

– Who are you playing for? (you or someone else) It’s amazing how many are playing because they don’t want to disappoint a parent or coach.

– What are your goals? (They MUST have clearly defined, written out goals)

– What is your ‘Why” behind each goal?

My FREE Momentum Series will help them establish their goals and discover their ‘why’ www.JeffHeggie.com/momentum

How Do You Help an Athlete Build Their Self-Confidence?

“Confidence isn’t walking into a room with your nose in the air, and thinking you are better than everyone else, it’s walking into a room and not having to compare yourself to anyone else in the first place.”

Confidence is being prepared. But there is a lot more to it than just putting in the practice.

What is happening in the mind has a major impact on confidence.

Creating powerful self-talk is one of the first things I work on with my athletes. Other areas of importance are body language, visualization, habits, and how they all tie together.

Show Them You Care

“The most beautiful thing in the world is to see your parents smiling and knowing that you are the reason behind that smile.”

Regardless of their age or skill level, talk to your athlete about how this past year has impacted them.  Discuss these ideas and how they could help their mental preparation for their season.

Above all else, show they you are genuinely interested and you care!

If they are serious about building their confidence, developing a powerful mindset, and unlocking their full potential, register them for The Confident Athlete Program at www.JeffHeggie.com/ConfidentAthlete.


Published by D. Jeff Heggie

Father, Husband, Coach & Entrepreneur

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