Book Quote of the Week 124

Two are better than one if two act as one.

And if you believe that two acting as one are better than one, just imagine what an entire team acting as one can do.

Coach K.

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Book Quote of the Week – 123

Struggle is not optional – it’s neurologically required: in order to get your skill circuit to fire optimally, you must by definition fire the circuit sub optimally; you must make mistakes and pay attention to those mistakes; you must slowly teach your circuit. You must also keep firing that circuit – i.e., practicing – in order to keep myelin functioning properly.

Daniel Coyle

310 Pounds to Nike Athlete

I listened to Ed Mylett’s interview with Charlie Rocket today and loved it. Charlie’s story is so interesting and motivational. From discovering Travis Porter, launching Two Chainz to inspiring Nike’s recent Kaepernick commercial. At 5’8″ and 305lbs he decided he was an athlete and ten months later completed the Iron Man competition. He’s brilliant, he’s a thinker. He teaches so much. I just wanted to share the interview for others to be able to watch.

 

Book Quote of the Week – 120

“There are five fundamental qualities that make every team great: communication, trust, collective responsibility, caring, and pride. I like to think of each as a separate finder on the fist. Any one individually is important. But all of them together are unbeatable.” – Coach K.

 

Book Quote of the Week 119

Don’t look for the big, quick improvement. Seek the small improvement one day at a time. That’s the only way it happens — and when it happens, it lasts. The importance of reputation until automaticity cannot be overstated.

John Wooden

 

Book Quote of the Week – 115

“The second reason deep practice is a strange concept is that it takes events that we normally strive to avoid – namely, mistakes – and turns them into skills. To understand how deep practice works, then, it’s first useful to consider the unexpected but crucial importance of errors to the learning process.” – Daniel Coyle

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Book Quote of the Week 114

“What made (John) Wooden a great coach wasn’t praise, wasn’t denunciation, and certainly wasn’t pep talks. His skill resided in the Gatling-gun rattle of targeted information he fired at his players. This, not that. Here, not there.

Book Quote of the Week 110

“Sixty percent of what you teach applies to everybody. The trick is how you get that sixty percent to the person. If I teach you, I’m concerned about what you think and how you think. I want to teach you how to learn in a way that’s right for you. My greatest challenge is not teaching Tom Brady but some guy who can’t do it at all, and getting them to a point where they can. Now that is coaching.”

Tom Martinez

Book Quote of the Week -108

When Brown came up with the idea of an app for sending disappearing photos, Spiegel was the first person he told. The response: “That’s a million-dollar idea!

The Snapchat Story

 

 

 

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Book Quote of the Week – 107

“Deep practice is built on a paradox: struggling in certain targeted ways – operating at the edges of your ability, where you make mistakes – makes you smarter. Or to put it a slightly different way, experiences where you’re forced to slow down, make errors, and correct them – as you would if you were walking up an ice-covered hill, slipping and stumbling as you go – end up making you swift and graceful without your realizing it.” – Daniel Coyle


Book Quote of the Week – 105

“The people inside the talent hotbeds are engaged in an activity that seems, on the face of it, strange and surprising. They are seeking out the slippery hills… they are purposely operating at the edges of their ability, so they will screw up. And somehow screwing up is making them better.” – Daniel Coyle

Book Quote of the Week 104

High performers can do almost anything they set their heart and their mind to. But not every mountain is worth the climb. What differentiates high performers from others is their critical eye in figuring out what is going to be meaningful to their life experience. They spend more of their time doing things that they find meaningful, and this makes them happy.

Brendon Burchard