The Most Gifted and Recommended Books from Tools of Titans by Tim Ferris

This list is at the end of a previous post, Review Notes from Tools of Titans by Tim Ferriss, but I wanted to add it here to keep it separate for reference.

Many of these top 17 books are some that I have already read. But for those that I have not, they are next on my list. If you’re interested in any of them click on their title or join Audible and listen to them. Try Audible and Get Two Free Audiobooks

In addition to this list, there are a number of other great books listed in Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers by Tim Ferriss. Check it out, it’s a great book.

The Most-Gifted And Recommended Books of All Guests
  1. Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
  2. Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
  3. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harai
  4. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
  5. The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich by Tim Ferriss
  6. The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right by Atul Gawande
  7. Dune by Frank Herbert
  8. Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, Revised Edition by Robert Cialdini
  9. Stumbling on Happiness by Daniel Gilbert
  10. Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies by Nick Bostrom
  11. Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! (Adventures of a Curious Character) by Richard P Feynman
  12. The 4 Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat Loss, Incredible Sex and Becoming Superhuman by Tim Ferriss
  13. The Bible
  14. The Hard Things About Hard Things by Ben Horowitz
  15. The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles by Steven Pressfield
  16. Watchmen by Alan Moore
  17. Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future by Peter Thiel with Black Masters.
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Your Team Needs Intentional and Effective Communication

dave_ramsey_entreleadershipOne of the things that I have prided myself with in my company is our team communication. It would make me proud to hear someone else from our team talking to a new employee or a potential employee and tell them how great our team communication is.

But the other day I received a call from one of our team members that had some concerns. His concerns had caused some problems between him and another team member. The problem is that as we discussed the situation I came to realize that the entire situation was created because of some poor communication from me.

In Dave Ramsey’s book,EntreLeadership: 20 Years of Practical Business Wisdom from the Trenches he says, “One of the hallmarks of winning companies is they are very intentional and effective at communication.”

For the success of a company and a team we must always be reminding ourselves about the importance of intentional and effective communication.

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Communicate With Your Customers

For Fathers Day my wife surprised me with a weekend getaway to Whitefish, Montana. We stayed at a beautiful hotel on the mountain. It was a wonderful way to relax. I loved the subtle smell throughout the halls of firewood burning in the huge stone fireplace in the lobby. Our room had a large TV above the fireplace where we could sit back, relax and watch movies. The weather was great, so we were able to enjoy sitting poolside sipping on our drinks.

I had a great time with the  woman I love, in a great hotel with great weather.   Everything was perfect. That is, until breakfast.  We decided to stay at the hotel for breakfast and went down to the restaurant. After a little confusion we finally asked someone if we were supposed to seat ourselves or if someone would be seating us. We were suppose to wait to be seated, and they finally showed us to our table. Neither of us were real hungry. I ordered a couple eggs and toast while my wife ordered an omelet. Everything seemed fine at that point. We waited for our food, and we waited. And we waited. And we waited. I couldn’t understand why two eggs, toast and an omelet were taking so long.  We waited more. Nobody came by our table to give us an explanation. Nobody even came close enough that I could call them over to ask what was going on. I was getting upset. Finally someone, other than our waitress, brought our food out. There was no explanation or apology. So I commented that I thought it was rediculous how long it took to get our food. The only explanation I received was that they were busy and the kitchen could only do so much. As I looked around at the restaurant, which was about 1/4 full, I wondered to myself what their service was like when it got really busy.

Needless to say, even though I would highly recommend the hotel, I would not recommend their restaurant. This experience made me think about my own business.  In my business we have factories in the US where we produce our product.  But the majority of our sales are in Canada.  So every day we are working out logistics on shipping our product, and there can often times be delays. For example, last week we had brokered a shipment with a company and their truck just never showed up to pick up the load.  This obviously changes our ETA’s on some of our customers orders because we have to arrange a new truck to pick up for us.  (and no, we will not ever do business with that broker again)

How do we deal with our end customers at this point?  Do we just ignore the situation and deliver to our customers when the truck does arrive?  If that’s how we deal with it, I think it’s the same as how we were treated at the restaurant.  There are three things that I think we need to pay attention to in a situation like this.

  1. Communication
    • Clear communication with a customer can make all the difference in their overall satisfaction.  When I was waiting for my breakfast, if the waitress had just come to our table and addressed the problem, let us know our food would take some extra time to arrive, I would have been a lot happier customer than I was.
  2. What does the customer expect
    • What do you need to do to keep the customer happy?  In our situation, the communication of letting us know our meal would take a while to arrive would have been enough.  With other customers a little more may be required to keep them happy.  But until you communicate with them you don’t know what they want or expect.
  3. Keep the experience positive
    • Chances of me staying at that hotel again are good.  Chances of me eating at that restaurant again are not very good.  Look for opportunities to make the best of a situation and ensure the customers experience is still a positive one.  Repeat customers or customer referrals are what makes a business truly successful.  When problems arise, find ways to keep the customer happy so they will come back again.

With all three keys, it comes down to good communication.  Communicating with your customer can be tough at times.  We all hate to give someone bad news.  But more often that not, the customers disappointment when you give them bad news will not be as bad as it will be if you just ignore the bad news and let them find out on their own.  Communicate, be honest and do your best.  There’s not much more you can do.