Book Quote of the Week – 139

Interesting question:

Why do break-through performances sometimes ignite talent booms, and sometimes not?

The answer is that talent hotbeds possess more than a single primal cue. They contain complex collections of signals – people, images, and ideas – that keep ignition going for the weeks, months, and years that skill-growing requires.

 

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Book Quote of the Week – 123

Struggle is not optional – it’s neurologically required: in order to get your skill circuit to fire optimally, you must by definition fire the circuit sub optimally; you must make mistakes and pay attention to those mistakes; you must slowly teach your circuit. You must also keep firing that circuit – i.e., practicing – in order to keep myelin functioning properly.

Daniel Coyle

Book Quote of the Week – 115

“The second reason deep practice is a strange concept is that it takes events that we normally strive to avoid – namely, mistakes – and turns them into skills. To understand how deep practice works, then, it’s first useful to consider the unexpected but crucial importance of errors to the learning process.” – Daniel Coyle

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Book Quote of the Week – 105

“The people inside the talent hotbeds are engaged in an activity that seems, on the face of it, strange and surprising. They are seeking out the slippery hills… they are purposely operating at the edges of their ability, so they will screw up. And somehow screwing up is making them better.” – Daniel Coyle

Book Quote of the Week – 101

“The fact that a targeted effort can increase learning velocity tenfold sounds like a fairy tales in which a handful of tiny seeds grow into an enchanted vine. But strangely, the enchanted vine turns out to be something close to neurological fact.”

– Daniel Coyle –