Book Quote of the Week 119

Don’t look for the big, quick improvement. Seek the small improvement one day at a time. That’s the only way it happens — and when it happens, it lasts. The importance of reputation until automaticity cannot be overstated.

John Wooden

 

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Book Quote of the Week – 115

“The second reason deep practice is a strange concept is that it takes events that we normally strive to avoid – namely, mistakes – and turns them into skills. To understand how deep practice works, then, it’s first useful to consider the unexpected but crucial importance of errors to the learning process.” – Daniel Coyle

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Book Quote of the Week 114

“What made (John) Wooden a great coach wasn’t praise, wasn’t denunciation, and certainly wasn’t pep talks. His skill resided in the Gatling-gun rattle of targeted information he fired at his players. This, not that. Here, not there.

Book Quote of the Week – 105

“The people inside the talent hotbeds are engaged in an activity that seems, on the face of it, strange and surprising. They are seeking out the slippery hills… they are purposely operating at the edges of their ability, so they will screw up. And somehow screwing up is making them better.” – Daniel Coyle

Book Quote of the Week – 101

“The fact that a targeted effort can increase learning velocity tenfold sounds like a fairy tales in which a handful of tiny seeds grow into an enchanted vine. But strangely, the enchanted vine turns out to be something close to neurological fact.”

– Daniel Coyle –